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As online streaming continues to blur the line between film and television, so does the sophistication of how series are made. At the moment, HBO are the ones with the firmest grip on television’s withering flag, holding it up against Netflix’s growing empire and, here, they really demonstrate why. Perhaps watching the whole series in a single day assisted this sensation, but Westworld was a piece that really did flow like a ten-hour movie.

Usually, when attempting an entire series in a single sitting, there always comes a point when the attention seeps away and you are merely still watching for the sense of achievement, whilst gradually ruining the experience for yourself. Westworld doesn’t let you ruin it. How? Well, it does something that even some of the best television series fail to do – put something big in every episode that moves the story forward in a majorly important way. There is no filler in Westworld; it all flows together to form one giant narrative and, whilst it could be viewed as a giant movie, it does all the multiple-perspective plotline work that only television can accomplish.

Boasting a rich belt of characters, matched by the calibre of actors playing them (one of Anthony Hopkin’s finest), the series doesn’t just juggle all these threads at once, it sews them together seamlessly. Sometimes they can leave a couple of characters for an episode and, when they are eventually returned to, you immediately remember where they were left. That’s one thing that could have gone very wrong with such a complex story like this – the audience could have easily gotten lost. This is not to say you won’t ever get lost, but it’s clear that the show wants you to be lost in these instants. The big reveals do not disappoint, whilst not corrupting the earlier end of the season. In fact, they are hidden so well prior to their reveal that I’m sure they grant a rewarding second viewing.

Whilst I will need a long break before I ever attempt to return to it, I was enthralled by how well plotted, written, directed and performed Westworld was. High-concept science-fiction blending together far too well with classical Western conventions; the ideas of the original Westworld updated with the potential of modern technological developments like 3D printing; existential themes of God-complexes and  reincarnation – an awful lot is covered and it’s all phenomenally executed. I’m sure there are minor issues to be had but, after absorbing the whole thing at once, they really are just needles in a large and very satisfyingly stacked barn of hay.

As an escapist through and through, I’d definitely recommend this as an experience. The next morning, I genuinely woke up feeling as if I’d been somewhere else the previous day.

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